Increase Capacity to Address Pandemic-Related Hate

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

County Spending Category
2.6 Addressing Trauma and Violence
Federal Expenditure Category
Community Violence Interventions
Project Launch Date
07/01/2022
Anticipated End Date
06/30/2024
Interpretation Languages
  • Cambodian (Khmer)
  • Korean
  • Spanish
  • Tagalog/Filipino
  • Thai
  • Mandarin
  • Cantonese
  • Vietnamese
  • Japanese
Written Languages
  • Cambodian (Khmer)
  • Korean
  • Spanish
  • Tagalog/Filipino
  • Thai
  • Traditional Chinese
  • Simplified Chinese
  • Vietnamese
  • Japanese

Project Contacts

Indicators & Metrics to Date

  • Establish Dream Center
    0
  • Number of youth trained in restorative justice and peer mediation.
    642
  • Number of youth who receive leadership skill development opportunities.
    17055
  • Number of student visits to a Dream Center per month.
    38269
  • Number of arts and cultural interventions provided per month.
    190
  • Number of allies who attend the sponsored events per month.
    3377
  • % youth who report increased levels of school engagement, feelings of school safety, and plans for positive school outcomes per school year after visiting a DC.
    95
  • Develop training video with subrecipient.
    1
  • Number of law enforcement personnel trained to accept hate reports.
    1944
  • Number of brochures/printed materials distributed promoting LA vs Hate and the ability to report through 211LA.
    39350
  • Number of people receiving referrals to case management services after reporting pandemic-related hate act.
    465
  • Number of people receiving referrals to case management services after reporting pandemic-related hate act.
    702
  • Number of victims who report hate acts to 211 LA that indicate they heard of LA vs Hate through law enforcement. (N/A)
    113
  • Number of pandemic related hate crime victims who participated in a survey report positive experiences with healing strategies. (N/A).
    31
  • Number of first responders who participated in a training and completed a feedback survey indicate they have learned something new about how to help victims of hate. (N/A)
    35

Target Populations

  • People with Disabilities
  • Systems Impacted Individuals
  • Systems Involved Individuals
  • Individuals Experiencing Mental Health Disorders
  • Individuals Experiencing Substance Use Disorders
  • People Experiencing Homelessness

Project Description

During the COVID-19 pandemic, hate crimes in 2021 increased by 23% in L.A. County, according to the LA County Hate Crime Report, the highest reported increase since 2002. Hate violence targeted African Americans, who are just 9% of the county’s population, yet accounted for 46% of racial crime victims. A total of 169 anti-Black crimes were reported, an increase of 35%. Anti-Latino crimes were up 10% to 117, and anti-white crimes jumped to 50, a 127% increase. Hate crimes targeting Asians increased to 77, the largest number in 20 years. Data from the 211-LA hate reporting line indicates that from September 2019 to December 2022, there were over 1,500 reports of hate acts of all types, including bias-motivated bullying. A community survey produced by the Asian Youth Center found that parents and students in AAPI-heavy San Gabriel Valley are requesting additional resources to prevent bullying, anxiety, and fear of being targeted for hate. [12:45 PM] Michelle Dughbaj This project will respond to the negative economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many historically targeted communities have experienced hate, violence, and bullying during the pandemic. The result was their financial, mental, and physical states were put in jeopardy and demonstrated negative behavior changes – whether becoming isolated; not engaging in cherished activities; or withdrawing from family, friends, or social media. Having trusted partners with long experience in providing needed services to these communities will allow LA vs. Hate to be ready to address the disparate harm caused by hate violence towards historically vulnerable communities. Given today’s education, workplace, and community challenges, keeping students, families, and businesses healthy positively impacts physical, mental, and economic health and well-being. Providing prevention and response program services to historically vulnerable and targeted victims of hate violence helps build peaceful, stable communities. This program’s service population reflects all COVID-19 Vulnerability and Recovery Index factors: victims of historically targeted vulnerable communities for risk of trauma and violence are served without eligibility determinations. The service population who are targeted for trauma and violence due to bias-motivation either self-refer through a call to 211-LA or through reports to anti-hate service provider partners who in turn refer victims for services through 211-LA follow-up services; are referred by law enforcement or by media attention or Board office staff. TRANCHE 2 FUNDING This program in Tranche 2 will build capacity and develop resources as such: 1. Nine Dream Centers will launch at schools with high intergroup tensions or high rates of pandemic-related needs. The Dream Centers will provide needed Safe Space healing interventions, resources, supplies, and skills-building opportunities for youth leadership development. 2. Countywide training for law enforcement on the importance of treating victims of hate with dignity and respect will continue, increasing to include small law enforcement agencies, county department private security firms, school resource officers, and higher education security departments. 4. Case management services at Asian Americans Advancing Justice-So Cal will continue, with links to AAPI-speaking case managers; and 5. An outside firm to evaluate the efficacy of these activities in decreasing hate acts.

Goals & Objectives

Goal Description By June 30, 2024, establish 9 Dream Centers throughout Los Angeles County that will provide services and opportunities to youth and community members that will result in increased levels of school engagement, feelings of school safety, plans for positive school outcomes such as preparing for college or trade school, and engagements to help heal from the trauma of hate. (Timeline increased to reflect Tranche 2 funds.)

Objective Description Each Dream Center will equip students, family/caregivers, school staff, and community members with preventative strategies, resources, and positive healing strategies that are geared towards social and mental well-being.

Activity Description Establish nine Dream Centers in middle or high schools across Los Angeles County that provide training in restorative justice and peer mediation and assistance in developing student leadership skills in areas such as conducting meetings, community outreach, civic engagement, community building, public speaking, student-led projects.
Indicators
# Type Name Baseline Target
24 Performance Establish Dream Center 8.00
25 Performance Establish Dream Center 1.00
26 Service Delivery Number of youth trained in restorative justice and peer mediation. 45.00
27 Service Delivery Number of youth trained in restorative justice and peer mediation. 50.00
28 Service Delivery Number of youth who receive leadership skill development opportunities. 50.00
29 Service Delivery Number of youth who receive leadership skill development opportunities. 50.00
30 Service Delivery Number of student visits to a Dream Center per month. 500.00

Activity Description Dream Centers will offer various workshops and events for students, family/caregivers, community members, and school staff to cope and heal from the trauma of hate.
Indicators
# Type Name Baseline Target
31 Service Delivery Number of arts and cultural interventions provided per month. 5.00
32 Service Delivery Number of allies who attend the sponsored events per month. 25.00

Outcome Description Across all DC activities and all DC sites, at least 30,000 residents, students, school staff, parents, and caregivers receive training, participate in activities, and/or receive services via the Dream Centers (may be duplicate counts/ not unique participants).
Indicators
# Type Name Baseline Target
33 Program Outcome % youth who report increased levels of school engagement, feelings of school safety, and plans for positive school outcomes per school year after visiting a DC. 0.75

Goal Description By June 30, 2024, train at least 10,000 first responders who may receive reports of hate (i.e., law enforcement, Metro, school, community resource officers), to appropriately receive hate incident reports, as well as train them on resources available to the victims of hate so they can appropriately refer the victims. (Timeline and number of enforcement individuals increased to reflect Tranche 2 funds.)

Objective Description By June 30, 2024, improve community response to acts of hate and increase reporting of hate incidents by building law enforcement awareness of LA vs. Hate resources.

Activity Description Train first responder frontline staff on how to engage and work with victims of hate acts and how to appropriately respond to reports of hate acts, including providing print materials to distribute to victims of hate acts.
Indicators
# Type Name Baseline Target
10 Service Delivery Develop training video with subrecipient. 1.00
14 Service Delivery Number of brochures/printed materials distributed promoting LA vs Hate and the ability to report through 211LA. 20000.00
15 Service Delivery Number of brochures/printed materials distributed promoting LA vs Hate and the ability to report through 211LA. 20000.00

Outcome Description A video training will capture the importance of first responders treating victims of hate with compassion and respect to increase reporting of under-reported hate incidents and hate crimes due to fear of victims reporting to law enforcement.

Goal Description By June 30, 2024, refer at least 300 persons who report acts of hate related to COVID-19 to culturally and linguistically appropriate services resulting in improved interventions through a partnership with a service agency thereby ensuring that hate crime victims report positive experiences with healing strategies. (Timeline extended to reflect Tranche 2 funds.)

Objective Description Offer effective hate victim support through the use of a hate reporting line to link victims of hate to needed services and resources in culturally and lingusitically appropriate avenues.

Activity Description Partner with Asian Americans Advancing Justice-So Cal to provide culturally and linguistically appropriate case mangement services for promoting healing after pandemic-related hate acts, such as translation support, mental health referrals, pro-bono legal assistance.
Indicators
# Type Name Baseline Target
5 Service Delivery Number of people receiving referrals to case management services after reporting pandemic-related hate act. 300.00
7 Service Delivery Number of people receiving referrals to case management services after reporting pandemic-related hate act. 300.00

Outcome Description Case managers at AAAJ-So Cal provide linguistically and culturally proficient services to victims of hate which support positive outcomes of healing from victim's reports of hate.