Domestic Violence Shelter-Based Program

PUBLIC HEALTH

County Spending Category
2.6 Addressing Trauma and Violence
Federal Expenditure Category
Community Violence Interventions
Project Launch Date
08/01/2022
Anticipated End Date
12/30/2024
Interpretation Languages
  • Armenian
  • Cambodian (Khmer)
  • Farsi
  • Korean
  • Russian
  • Spanish
  • Tagalog/Filipino
  • Mandarin
  • Cantonese
  • Arabic

Project Contacts

Indicators & Metrics to Date

  • Housing Navigation/Housing Case Management Clients Served
    0
  • Legal Services for Domestic Violence - Clients Served
    0
  • Hotel Shelter for Domestic Violence - Clients Served
    0
  • Counseling Services for Domestic Violence Clients Served
    0
  • Life Skills Services for Domestic Violence Clients Served
    0
  • Gift Cards /Household Needs for Domestic Violence Clients Served
    0
  • Percentage of clients who increased their level of safety-related empowerment
    0
  • Percentage of clients that increased their income
    0
  • Percentage of project clients that disaggregated demographic data was collected from
    0
  • Number of Adult Clients Served in the DV Project
    0
  • Number of Dependent Children Served in the DV Project
    0

Target Populations

  • People Experiencing Homelessness

Project Description

Domestic violence (DV) also called intimate partner violence happens to people who are or have been in a close relationship. It can occur within a range of relationships including among couples who are married, living together, or dating. Abuse occurs when a domestic partner wants to control, physically harm, or have power over their partner. For example, a partner may control communications, daily behavior, finances, economic resources, and many other behaviors that cause severe emotional distress. These behaviors frighten, intimidate, terrorize, manipulate, hurt, humiliate, blame, injure, and often traumatize their partner. DV can take many forms including emotional, sexual and physical abuse, stalking and threats of abuse. Individuals that experience DV are often isolated from friends, relatives, or other support, and/or are deprived of basic needs. Anyone can experience DV regardless of race, age, sexual orientation, religion, gender, socioeconomic status and educational level. Risk increases when people are unemployed or underemployed, impacted by poverty and have history of being abused themselves or witnessing violence. Adjusting to COVID has been difficult for most people, however, it has disproportionality impacted those experiencing domestic violence. The COVID-19 pandemic has affected most aspects of daily life for people and communities world-wide, without a defined end. The pandemic has resulted in economic devastation, disconnection from support systems, community resources and has created widespread uncertainty and elevated stress. Such conditions may stimulate conflict in relationships where it didn’t exist and worsen it where it has been a problem. During the height of the pandemic, communities were encouraged to stay home to protect themselves and others. We know that home is not safe for those who had little choice but to shelter in place with an abuser. Domestic violence survivors are a historically marginalized group who were adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Although we are no longer in a COVID surge, its negative impacts are long lasting. The goal of the project is to address and mitigate the significant negative impacts of the pandemic for DV survivors by funding DV community-based organizations to provide shelter and support services to DV survivors that will move them towards social and emotional well-being. By utilizing an evidence-based assessment tool Measure of Victim Empowerment Related to Safety (MOVERS) to determine client status, we aim to help increase client’s level of safety-related empowerment, knowledge, and skills to access available support. 1 United Nations (https://www.un.org/en/coronavirus/what-is-domestic-abuse) 2 Wathen C.N. and MacMillan, H.L. (2013). Children’s exposure to IPV: Impacts and interventions. Pediatric Child Health. 2013 Oct; 18(8): 419–422. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3887080/

Goals & Objectives

Goal Description By August 31, 2024, the project will assist survivors who have been negatively and disproportionately impacted during the COVID-19 pandemic in gaining a sense of safety so that they can move towards social, financial, and emotional well-being by providing access to case management, skills building, supportive counseling, emergency shelter, legal services, and/or assistance with basic needs to at least 1600 domestic violence survivors.

Objective Description By August 31, 2024, OWH staff will partner with at least 29 DV community-based organizations to provide shelter and support services to DV survivors.

Activity Description Develop safety plans with domestic violence survivors that includes providing access to services that include case management, life skill services to enhance skills building (coping, emotional regulation, problem solving, parenting, resource attainment), supportive counseling, emergency shelter, and/or assistance with basic needs such as food, emergency clothing, toiletries, etc.
Indicators
# Type Name Baseline Target
1 Service Delivery Housing Navigation/Housing Case Management Clients Served
1 Service Delivery Number of Adult Clients Served in the DV Project 0.00 800.00
1 Service Delivery Number of Dependent Children Served in the DV Project 0.00 900.00
2 Service Delivery Legal Services for Domestic Violence - Clients Served
3 Service Delivery Hotel Shelter for Domestic Violence - Clients Served
4 Service Delivery Counseling Services for Domestic Violence Clients Served
5 Service Delivery Life Skills Services for Domestic Violence Clients Served
6 Service Delivery Gift Cards /Household Needs for Domestic Violence Clients Served
7 Service Delivery Number of Adult Clients Served in the DV Project 0.00 800.00
8 Service Delivery Number of Dependent Children Served in the DV Project 0.00 900.00

Outcome Description Individuals that participated in the ARP for DV program will increase their level of safety-related empowerment by the end of the project.
Indicators
# Type Name Baseline Target
1 Program Outcome Percentage of clients who increased their level of safety-related empowerment 0.00 60.00
2 Program Outcome Percentage of clients who increased their level of safety-related empowerment 0.00 60.00

Outcome Description Individuals that participated in the ARP for DV program will increase their income (e.g., CalWORKs, General Relief, or other income) by the end of the project.
Indicators
# Type Name Baseline Target
1 Program Outcome Percentage of clients that increased their income 0.00 40.00
1 Program Outcome Percentage of clients that increased their income 0.00 40.00

Outcome Description Disaggregated racial/ethnic demographics data will be collected from ARP for DV Program participants by the end of the project. DPH OWH will examine the data with an equity lens.
Indicators
# Type Name Baseline Target
1 Program Outcome Percentage of project clients that disaggregated demographic data was collected from 0.00 90.00
1 Program Outcome Percentage of project clients that disaggregated demographic data was collected from 0.00 90.00